A poignant

Gettysburg

Address

Lucy Williams Junios

Lucy was born into a slave family, between 1820 and 1835 — there is only verbal history based conjecture by family members. Her maiden name, or a first married name, was Williams. 

Drawing on the 1880 census, family stories say both Lucy and her father were born in Kentucky, and that she was brought to Texas as a slave.

By 1910, she is listed in the U.S. census, living in Texas with her husband William Junios. He is believed to be her second husband, but this census shows them as having been married for 50 years.

Voris Brumfield, with  seven of her 18 grandchildren

Voris Brumfield

will assume the persona of her great-grandmother, Lucy Junios, while orating the Emancipation t

Proclamation to remind event-goers of the significant role of the Civil War in shaping the future of our nation. 

 

Voris received a BA in Theater from University of Denver and taught Theater Arts at Yuba College for eight years. She directed plays for Lake County Repertory Theater 10 years, wrote and directed the popular Middletown Renaissance Christmas Pageant & Feast for 10 years. For nearly 8 years Voris has led a one-hour weekly multidimensional production on Sunday mornings as a Lay Pastor with two Methodist congregations in Lake County.

President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address as he dedicated Gettysburg National Cemetery November 19, 1863. This United States national cemetery, originally called Soldiers' National Cemetery, was created for Union casualties of the July 1-3, 1863, Battle of Gettysburg in the American Civil War. It is located just outside Gettysburg Borough, in Adams County, Pennsylvania. The land was part of the Gettysburg Battlefield, and the cemetery is within Gettysburg National Military Park. The cemetery contains 3,512 interments from the Civil War.

Battlefield monuments, memorials, and markers are scattered throughout the cemetery, and its stone walls, iron fences and gates, burial and section markers, and brick sidewalk are listed as contributing structures within Gettysburg Battlefield Historic District.

The America War between the Union Stats and Confederate States began at 4:30 a.m. on April 12, 1861, when the Confederates fired 50 cannons at Fort Sumter in South Carolina. It as been newly discovered that  750,000 soldiers died in the Civil War. These soldiers not only died in combat but also from starvation and disease. On April 9, 1865, Robert E. Lee and the Confederate Army surrendered to General Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia at Appomattox Court House. The last battle was fought at Palmito Ranch in Texas.